fastcompany:

"I literally see these robots skirting around the lab, and it was almost as if I had this huge flashback to Star Wars. If we are ever going to see robots like that, it’s going to start in a lab just like this, right now, right here.”
Read More>

fastcompany:

"I literally see these robots skirting around the lab, and it was almost as if I had this huge flashback to Star Wars. If we are ever going to see robots like that, it’s going to start in a lab just like this, right now, right here.”

Read More>

techstuffhsw:

TechStuff Prints in 3D (Again)

We all hear a lot of buzz about the incredible future of 3D printing, but what about the incredible present? (Er, and the not-so-incredible present?) Special guest Joe McCormick — head writer of Fw:Thinking and pretty rad dude — joins us to talk about the state of 3D printing today. Tune in to learn what’s going on in the industry, what the 3D learning curve is like, and how you can get started.

techstuffhsw:

The Future of Health Monitoring: Electronic Skin

From brain waves to blood flow, these miniature, flexible circuits stick to your skin and monitor your vital signs. Recently, thanks to research from the University of Texas at Austin, these patches have been given memory, and are able to record what’s going on. So what does this mean for the future of health care?

Still curious? Tune in to our accompanying podcast episode, Tech Gets Bendy, to learn lots more about flexible electronics.

howstuffworks:

TechStuff » Tesla: The Man, the Myths, the Truth

Nikola Tesla was a genius, a science nerd, and an underdog — the perfect recipe for an Internet superhero. But who was Nikola Tesla, really? What did he actually invent? Join Jonathan and Lauren as they explore some of the popular misconceptions about Tesla’s life and work.

Tesla in his laboratory, circa 1910. [Image source]

missedinhistory:

Here’s our updated two-parter on Tesla, too:

Nikola Tesla and the War of Currents Revisited: Part 1

Nikola Tesla and the War of Currents Revisited: Part 2

And for further reading, see: 10 Reasons Why Tesla Is a Scientific God.

techstuffhsw:

TechStuff Camps Out

From the good old days of roughing it to the campsite of the future, we look at the technology that makes camping possible — and increasingly comfortable. Tune in to learn about ultralight tents, sleeping bag material tech, solar powered gear, plus our favorite gadgets from simple chemical hand warmers to campsite fuel cells.

sciencealert:

The small intestine is notoriously difficult to examine, but it’s linked to several common illnesses including irritable bowel syndrome, coeliac disease and Crohn’s disease. This new imaging technique will allow doctors to diagnose and treat these ailments more effectively: http://bit.ly/1j7tqsI

sciencealert:

The small intestine is notoriously difficult to examine, but it’s linked to several common illnesses including irritable bowel syndrome, coeliac disease and Crohn’s disease. This new imaging technique will allow doctors to diagnose and treat these ailments more effectively: http://bit.ly/1j7tqsI

(via wildcat2030)

fastcompany:

This Paralyzed Man Can Now Move His Hand

When Ian Burkhart was 19, he accidentally dove into a sandbar while in the water with friends and quickly realized what had happened: He was paralyzed. Today, Burkhart is still paralyzed—but he can move his hand by controlling it with his mind.

Read More>

How Fireworks Work
An aerial firework is normally formed as a shell that consists of four parts:
Container - Usually pasted paper and string formed into a cylinder
Stars - Spheres, cubes or cylinders of a sparkler-like composition
Bursting charge - Firecracker-like charge at the center of the shell
Fuse - Provides a time delay so the shell explodes at the right altitude
Located just below the shell is a small cylinder that contains the lifting charge.
The shell is launched from a mortar. The mortar might be a short, steel pipe with a lifting charge of black powder that explodes in the pipe to launch the shell. When the lifting charge fires to launch the shell, it lights the shell’s fuse. The shell’s fuse burns while the shell rises to its correct altitude, and then ignites the bursting charge so it explodes.
A simple shell used in an aerial fireworks display. The blue balls are the stars, and the gray is black powder. The powder is packed into the center tube, which is the bursting charge. It is also sprinkled between the stars to help ignite them.
Simple shells consist of a paper tube filled with stars and black powder. Stars come in all shapes and sizes, but you can imagine a simple star as something like sparkler compound formed into a ball the size of a pea or a dime. The stars are poured into the tube and then surrounded by black powder. When the fuse burns into the shell, it ignites the bursting charge, causing the shell to explode. The explosion ignites the outside of the stars, which begin to burn with bright showers of sparks. Since the explosion throws the stars in all directions, you get the huge sphere of sparkling light that is so familiar at fireworks displays.
Read on for more about multibreak shells and fireworks displays.

How Fireworks Work

An aerial firework is normally formed as a shell that consists of four parts:

  • Container - Usually pasted paper and string formed into a cylinder
  • Stars - Spheres, cubes or cylinders of a sparkler-like composition
  • Bursting charge - Firecracker-like charge at the center of the shell
  • Fuse - Provides a time delay so the shell explodes at the right altitude

Located just below the shell is a small cylinder that contains the lifting charge.

The shell is launched from a mortar. The mortar might be a short, steel pipe with a lifting charge of black powder that explodes in the pipe to launch the shell. When the lifting charge fires to launch the shell, it lights the shell’s fuse. The shell’s fuse burns while the shell rises to its correct altitude, and then ignites the bursting charge so it explodes.

A simple shell used in an aerial fireworks display. The blue balls are the stars, and the gray is black powder. The powder is packed into the center tube, which is the bursting charge. It is also sprinkled between the stars to help ignite them.

Simple shells consist of a paper tube filled with stars and black powder. Stars come in all shapes and sizes, but you can imagine a simple star as something like sparkler compound formed into a ball the size of a pea or a dime. The stars are poured into the tube and then surrounded by black powder. When the fuse burns into the shell, it ignites the bursting charge, causing the shell to explode. The explosion ignites the outside of the stars, which begin to burn with bright showers of sparks. Since the explosion throws the stars in all directions, you get the huge sphere of sparkling light that is so familiar at fireworks displays.

Read on for more about multibreak shells and fireworks displays.

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

ucresearch:

A hovercraft that rides like a motorcycle


With what looks like a Speeder Bike from Star Wars, UCLA alum and aerospace engineer Mark DeRoche has developed a new type of hovercraft known as The Aero-X.  When onboard the rider feels like they’re driving a motorcycle.

The idea was to build a vehicle that could quickly glide over rough terrain. Your cruising speed could top out at 45mph at 10 feet off the ground on this thing.  DeRoche says it could be used by farmers, security personnel or search and rescue missions, but admits that it could also be for those who want to joyride out in the desert.

An unmanned version is also in the works for agricultural uses such as crop dusting large areas of land.

Read more about it here