ucresearch:

Mysterious ailment is wiping out starfish

UC Santa Cruz marine biologist Pete Raimondi is leading a team of scientists, laboratory technicians and geneticists to find the culprit.  The Ochre star, which is common along the Pacific coast, has been dying in large numbers in recent months:

"Where it has hit, it has been pretty lethal.  This is going on up and down the coast. It’s going to change what’s out there pretty fundamentally."

Read more about the story here

Also a while ago we visited a researcher at Bodega Marine Lab who talked about why these creatures are so important to marine ecosystems. 

Watch the video here

stufftoblowyourmind:

skeptv:

Mantis Shrimp Vs Octopus … the ultimate fight!

In this epic battle, we witness who would win if a mantis shrimp was pitted against a veined octopus. It’s a face to face, eye to eye crusade of the octopus versus the mantis shrimp!

via Weird underWater World.

That’s right. Suck it, Internet’s sudden obsession with Mantis shrimp. /Robert

laurajmoss:

Fresh out of the water, newborn sea lion pups roll in sand to protect themselves from the blazing sun in San Cristobal, Galapagos Islands.

laurajmoss:

Fresh out of the water, newborn sea lion pups roll in sand to protect themselves from the blazing sun in San Cristobal, Galapagos Islands.

(via mothernaturenetwork)

neaq:

Visitor Gifs: We just love pictures of jellies. But we really love sea jelly GIFs. Thanks for sharing! Come see the jellies.

jellyfish @ New England Aquarium (Boston)

amnhnyc:

When most people think of penguins, they think of Antarctica, where these flightless seabirds waddle over the ice and dive for fish and krill. But some penguins live on the coast of South America, thanks to a cold, north-flowing ocean current, and one tiny penguin lives in the tropics. Instead of huddling for warmth, it must battle the blazing heat of the sunbaked Galápagos Islands.
The Galápagos penguin is not only the smallest penguin and the only one found near the equator, but it is probably the only penguin that has to hold its wings outstretched over its webbed feet to prevent sunburn. 
© AMNH Library/5917
For more on penguins, check out the film on view now in the LeFrak IMAX Theater.

amnhnyc:

When most people think of penguins, they think of Antarctica, where these flightless seabirds waddle over the ice and dive for fish and krill. But some penguins live on the coast of South America, thanks to a cold, north-flowing ocean current, and one tiny penguin lives in the tropics. Instead of huddling for warmth, it must battle the blazing heat of the sunbaked Galápagos Islands.

The Galápagos penguin is not only the smallest penguin and the only one found near the equator, but it is probably the only penguin that has to hold its wings outstretched over its webbed feet to prevent sunburn. 

© AMNH Library/5917

For more on penguins, check out the film on view now in the LeFrak IMAX Theater.

ofpaperandponies:

astronomy-to-zoology:

Epimeria rubrieques

…is a large species of amphipod that is native to the waters of the eastern Antarctic Ocean. E.rubrieques is an opportunistic feeder and has been observed both scavenging and showcasing predatory behavior. It has been mostly observed on surfaces but is is known to be a motile epibenthic swimmer as well (meaning it rarely swims).This species was recently discovered and much of its biology and ecology still remains unknown. 

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Amphipoda-Gammaridea-Epimeriidae-Epimeria-rubrieques

Images: nasa.gov and Torben Riehl

Cuties!

(via stufftoblowyourmind)

mothernaturenetwork:

Jellyfish Lake will stun you (no stingers involved)
kqedscience:

Crazy living rock is one of the weirdest creatures we’ve ever seen
“The fact that this sea creature looks exactly like a rock with guts is not even the weirdest thing about it. It’s also completely immobile like a rock — it eats by sucking in water and filtering out microorganisms — and its clear blood mysteriously secretes a rare mineral called vanadium.”

kqedscience:

Crazy living rock is one of the weirdest creatures we’ve ever seen

The fact that this sea creature looks exactly like a rock with guts is not even the weirdest thing about it. It’s also completely immobile like a rock — it eats by sucking in water and filtering out microorganisms — and its clear blood mysteriously secretes a rare mineral called vanadium.”

(via npr)

earthlynation:

The Cuttlefish! Photography Shot By BirdinByNoon

This is perhaps the most determined-looking cuttlefish I’ve ever seen.

earthlynation:

The Cuttlefish! Photography Shot By BirdinByNoon

This is perhaps the most determined-looking cuttlefish I’ve ever seen.

Trapped in a Meeting: The Toothpick FishStuff You Should Know

Chuck tells Josh about a creature known as the toothpick fish, which finds its prey by sensing urea and ammonia excreted from other fish’s lungs, and relates some helpful advice in regards to swimming in the Amazon river. If it’s Monday, it must be Trapped in a Meeting.