missedinhistory:

Continuing on from Monday’s episode, today we tell the story of Andrews’ Raid, also known as the Great Locomotive Chase, from the time the raiders left Big Shanty until they were, in some cases posthumously, awarded the first Medals of Honor in the United States. (Also part of the story: a very dramatic jail break with an improbable route back to the Union.)

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

Toncinuing

missedinhistory:

Another installment from our listener-submitted suggestions for happier history subjects: Today’s episode is about the Great Locomotive Chase, also known as Andrews’ Raid. This is the story of a Northern raid deep into Southern territory during the American Civil War. The objective: Steal a train outside Atlanta, drive it north, and destroy the tracks along the way, cutting Atlanta off from the rest of the Confederacy and seriously hampering the South’s war effort. The chase itself is a lot of fun, even though its aftermath takes a more serious turn.

This episode is two parts. The first takes us up to the actual theft of the train, and the second takes us all the way through some very dramatic prison escapes to where these train engines are today.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

nevver:

August 16, 1977 - Elvis leaves the building

Tags: History Elvis

missedinhistory:

hen we asked for suggestions for happier history stories not long ago, we got a fair number of responses that were closer to “deeply upsetting” than “sunshine and unicorns” on the subject spectrum. Fortunately, Randy not only suggested longitude, but he also followed it with eight exclamation points. While not a 100 percent happy story, the story of longitude, and of European efforts to figure out how to calculate it, features inventions, clocks and shipwrecks – but mostly their prevention, not their carnage and loss. So: Randy wins.

Here’s a link to our notes and research on longitude, including, as promised, links on how to find your latitude.

missedinhistory:

The Teatro alla Scala is one of the most renowned opera houses in the world, and is Italy’s crown jewel of the arts. Even if you have only a passing knowledge of opera, odds are, you know a name connected to the history of this legendary cultural hub.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

In today’s episode: This guy sold the Eiffel Tower. Never mind that he did not own it at the time.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

Today’s episode draws from multiple, different requests from lots of listeners: It’s a brief history of colors, from simple and easily available pigments to dyes made from tens of thousands of snails.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

Early in the 1900s, Quaker Puffed Rice and Quaker Puffed Wheat were “The Cereal Shot From Guns.” Really. Here’s a commercial as proof. The slogan had to do with how the puffed grain cereals were made, and yet, for some unfathomable reason, it also eventually stopped doing the job of selling them. Quaker needed another plan, and turned to the novel idea of giving away tiny plots of land in exchange for box tops. I don’t have a commercial for that one, but I do have today’s episode.

Here’s a link to notes and research.

missedinhistory:

If you follow us on Facebook and Twitter, you may have seen me put out a request recently for some happier history fare. I’d spent the weeks leading up to that request researching the Doctors’ Riot, the Battle of Blair Mountain and the subject of today’s episode – the Tulsa race riot of 1921, also known as the destruction of Black Wall Street. Holly and I have to pause our recording because we’ve become emotional often enough that it’s become kind of a running joke between us. This is the first time I’ve had to pause my research for that reason. I’d never heard of the event before listeners requested it, in part because it was deliberately swept under the rug for nearly half a century after it took place.

The population in and around Tulsa, Oklahoma, boomed prior to 1921, thanks to the discovery of oil in the area. The Tulsa suburb of Greenwood grew into a thriving African-American community thanks to a combination of segregation and black entrepreneurship. On May 31 and June 1, a mob of white Tulsa citizens, including sworn law enforcement and members of the National Guard, burned it down after being thwarted in their attempt to lynch a young black man for a crime he did not commit. Thousands lost their homes, and hundreds died.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

In 1921, roughly 10,000 coal miners fed up with unfair labor practices and exploitation took up arms against their employers. The resulting conflict lasted five days and has been called the biggest armed uprising on U.S. soil since the Civil War. It came to be known as the Battle of Blair Mountain.

did-you-kno:

"Twinkle Twinkle Little Star," "the Alphabet Song" and "Baa Baa Black Sheep" are all sung to the melody of "Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman," a French 1761 song most famously arranged by Mozart.
Source

did-you-kno:

"Twinkle Twinkle Little Star," "the Alphabet Song" and "Baa Baa Black Sheep" are all sung to the melody of "Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman," a French 1761 song most famously arranged by Mozart.

Source

missedinhistory:

In the 1600s, France had a problem. Both it and England were trying to build colonies in the Americas, and from population standpoint, England was way ahead, with its number of colonists in the low six figures. France, on the other hand, had only about 3,000 settlers in New France, thanks to a rather utilitarian view of women and children as inessential to a fur trapper’s bottom line. Louis XIV’s solution to this problem: shipping eligible ladies across the Atlantic to find husbands and start having babies.

We’re not blind to the many other issues that came about as a consequence of European colonization of the Americas (you’ll hear me mesh “colonization” and “colonialism” into one novel non-word) but today’s story is really about who these women were, how they got to New France and what happened to them after they arrived.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.