stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Who invented glitter?

Early humans used shimmery mica flakes to add some primitive glitter to cave paintings, and a 2013 study found that the ancient Maya even covered a 6th-century temple in a sparkling mica-infused paint to likely herald a celebratory event or anniversary. But when it comes to the tiny bits of plastics and aluminum we call glitter today, Henry Ruschmann accidentally invented it in 1934.

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Who invented glitter?

Early humans used shimmery mica flakes to add some primitive glitter to cave paintings, and a 2013 study found that the ancient Maya even covered a 6th-century temple in a sparkling mica-infused paint to likely herald a celebratory event or anniversary. But when it comes to the tiny bits of plastics and aluminum we call glitter today, Henry Ruschmann accidentally invented it in 1934.

stufftoblowyourmind:

CLASSIC STBYM: When viewed from the standpoint of geologic time, what is humanity’s ultimate contribution? Have we founded an Age of Man with agriculture, industrialism and war? Join Robert and Julie as they ask hard questions about humanity’s relationship with Earth.

Related Content:

Ghosts of Evolution (forthcoming podcast)

How Rewilding Works (forthcoming podcast)

How do recyclable plastics work?

How exactly is wind turned into energy?

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

When did gay go from meaning happy to homosexual?

Because “homosexual” hasn’t historically been a kind word to gay folks.

brainstuffshow:

Absinthe has a dangerous reputation. But will you really meet The Green Fairy if you drink it?

missedinhistory:

Today’s episode concludes our four-part series on China under the rule of Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong. It moves from where we left off last time (with most of Mao’s enemies, real and suspected, purged from the government) until his death and the Revolution’s aftermath. We also deal with some Western misconceptions of how the Revolution played out and how the CCP responded.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

My plan when starting our miniseries on China under Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong was a three-parter: the Great Leap Forward, the Great Famine and the Cultural Revolution. Between announcing the miniseries and recording that third installment, though, the Cultural Revolution grew into a two-parter.

Today we’re talking about the Cultural Revolution’s first couple of years. This covers the heyday of the Red Guard, which was essentially an unsupervised army of teenagers empowered by Mao to seek out, expose, harass and imprison “rightists,” “bad elements” and others. It also covers a massive purge of Mao’s enemies (real and perceived) within the Chinese government.

Here is a link to our notes and research.

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Why Women Paint Their Nails

History! Economics! Automobile Paint! You’ll never look at nail art the same.

missedinhistory:

Today’s episode is part two in our miniseries on China under the rule of Chinese Communist Party chairman Mao Zedong. Last time, we talked about the Great Leap Forward, which was an attempt to both turn China into a communist utopia and surpass the economic power of Great Britain (and, eventually, the United States). The Great Leap Forward was catastrophic from several angles, and one of its consequences was a massive famine, which we discuss today.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

brainstuffshow:

Did you know that our very own Ben Bowlin also co-hosts CarStuff? He & Scott just got up close with a 1941 Chrysler Thunderbolt!

huffingtonpost:

This Is How Much The Female Portrait Has Evolved In The Last 500 Years

Art history books have a reputation of showcasing dead, white, European males — DWEM — and the (mostly white) women they handpicked as muses. Portrait after portrait reveals a woman’s face through a man’s gaze, casting a rather unsavory light on the tendency of artists to eroticize, objectify or idolize the female form.

See the full video for a striking look at the female portrait.

(Souce:  artFido)

missedinhistory:

British Royal Navy lieutenant and artist Norman Wilkinson is usually credited with the idea of disruptive camouflage, which became known as dazzle camouflage - those high-contrast patterns painted on British ships during World War I. But, another man, naturalist John Graham Kerr, claimed that he had the idea three years earlier. Today’s episode is about that innovation and the argument that followed.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

In the mid-20th century, Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong launched an ambitious plan to revolutionize Chinese agriculture and industry, build up the economy and turn China into a communist utopia.It was called the Great Leap Forward.

This episode is the first of a four-part miniseries on China under the leadership of Chairman Mao.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.