missedinhistory:

If you follow us on Facebook and Twitter, you may have seen me put out a request recently for some happier history fare. I’d spent the weeks leading up to that request researching the Doctors’ Riot, the Battle of Blair Mountain and the subject of today’s episode – the Tulsa race riot of 1921, also known as the destruction of Black Wall Street. Holly and I have to pause our recording because we’ve become emotional often enough that it’s become kind of a running joke between us. This is the first time I’ve had to pause my research for that reason. I’d never heard of the event before listeners requested it, in part because it was deliberately swept under the rug for nearly half a century after it took place.

The population in and around Tulsa, Oklahoma, boomed prior to 1921, thanks to the discovery of oil in the area. The Tulsa suburb of Greenwood grew into a thriving African-American community thanks to a combination of segregation and black entrepreneurship. On May 31 and June 1, a mob of white Tulsa citizens, including sworn law enforcement and members of the National Guard, burned it down after being thwarted in their attempt to lynch a young black man for a crime he did not commit. Thousands lost their homes, and hundreds died.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

In 1921, roughly 10,000 coal miners fed up with unfair labor practices and exploitation took up arms against their employers. The resulting conflict lasted five days and has been called the biggest armed uprising on U.S. soil since the Civil War. It came to be known as the Battle of Blair Mountain.

did-you-kno:

"Twinkle Twinkle Little Star," "the Alphabet Song" and "Baa Baa Black Sheep" are all sung to the melody of "Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman," a French 1761 song most famously arranged by Mozart.
Source

did-you-kno:

"Twinkle Twinkle Little Star," "the Alphabet Song" and "Baa Baa Black Sheep" are all sung to the melody of "Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman," a French 1761 song most famously arranged by Mozart.

Source

missedinhistory:

In the 1600s, France had a problem. Both it and England were trying to build colonies in the Americas, and from population standpoint, England was way ahead, with its number of colonists in the low six figures. France, on the other hand, had only about 3,000 settlers in New France, thanks to a rather utilitarian view of women and children as inessential to a fur trapper’s bottom line. Louis XIV’s solution to this problem: shipping eligible ladies across the Atlantic to find husbands and start having babies.

We’re not blind to the many other issues that came about as a consequence of European colonization of the Americas (you’ll hear me mesh “colonization” and “colonialism” into one novel non-word) but today’s story is really about who these women were, how they got to New France and what happened to them after they arrived.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

Sawbones is a show about medical history. It’s for fun. Sometimes it’s also for giving me ideas for podcast subjects, which is what happened with today’s episode. After listening to the Sawbones episode Corpse Theft and the Resurrection Men while on a plane, I decided we needed an entire episode just on the Doctors’ Riot of 1788. That’s when a giant mob of people got so angry that buried bodies were being dug up for dissection that they stormed two different sites of medical study in New York. This was just one of at least 17 so-called anatomy riots in the U.S. between 1765 and 1854.

Here’s a link to our notes and research. We also hook you up with two places to learn whether England and France were at war in a given year. Since these are also for fun, please no pedantry about whether “England” or “France” is really the right name.

missedinhistory:

Today’s episode: 10,000+ years of cosmetics history (in brief). Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

Today in 1804: the duel between then-Vice President Aaron Burr and former Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton. Here’s our episode from the archive.

And for your reading pleasure: How Duels Work

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

31 Badass Women Born in July

July is summer sizzlin’ with lady birthday badassery.

missedinhistory:

We’re rapidly approaching the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, and right on its heels is the centennial of the Battle of Mons. One of the Battles of the Frontier, the Battle of Mons saw Great Britain fighting for the first time during the war. German forces ultimately forced the British to withdraw – and in the weeks and months following the battle, stories spread that angels had protected the British Expeditionary Force from compete annihilation as they did.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

howstuffworks:

TechStuff » Tesla: The Man, the Myths, the Truth

Nikola Tesla was a genius, a science nerd, and an underdog — the perfect recipe for an Internet superhero. But who was Nikola Tesla, really? What did he actually invent? Join Jonathan and Lauren as they explore some of the popular misconceptions about Tesla’s life and work.

Tesla in his laboratory, circa 1910. [Image source]