stufftoblowyourmind:

It’s difficult to overstate the impact of syphilis on the Western world, and it remains a threat to this day despite effective antibiotic treatments. In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert and Julie explore the history of the illness and its cultural effects, from powdered wigs and false noses to surgical advances and vampire myths.

Related Content:

Syphilis: The Great Imitator (podcast)

Anti-Syphilis Posters and the Monstrous Feminine

Artatomical: Rembrandt’s Portrait of de Lairesse

Artificial Noses and the Ravages of Syphilis

Monster of the Week: The Syphilitic Vampire

Quarantine (podcast)

Understanding Ebola (podcast)

missedinhistory:

Hetty Green was the wealthiest woman in the U.S., but her eccentric behavior and miserly ways led to bad press and a less-than-flattering nickname. (And one we’d heard so many times from listeners that both of us were sure she’d been the subject of an episode before.)

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

The Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Connecticut, was founded with the plan that it would educate young men, convert them to Christianity, and then send them back home again to spread their new-found religion. Many of these young men were from Hawaii or belonged to to one of the continental United States’ Native American tribes, so the school quickly became known as the Heathen School.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

todaysdocument:

Rare color scenes from the Liberation of Paris, August 25, 1944, including an intact Eiffel Tower flying the French Tricolour, General Charles De Gaulle marching down the Champs Elysees, and Allied troops marching in front of the Arc de Triomphe.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944

From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see World War II from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie PyleJack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway

Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

missedinhistory:

Continuing on from Monday’s episode, today we tell the story of Andrews’ Raid, also known as the Great Locomotive Chase, from the time the raiders left Big Shanty until they were, in some cases posthumously, awarded the first Medals of Honor in the United States. (Also part of the story: a very dramatic jail break with an improbable route back to the Union.)

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

Toncinuing

missedinhistory:

Another installment from our listener-submitted suggestions for happier history subjects: Today’s episode is about the Great Locomotive Chase, also known as Andrews’ Raid. This is the story of a Northern raid deep into Southern territory during the American Civil War. The objective: Steal a train outside Atlanta, drive it north, and destroy the tracks along the way, cutting Atlanta off from the rest of the Confederacy and seriously hampering the South’s war effort. The chase itself is a lot of fun, even though its aftermath takes a more serious turn.

This episode is two parts. The first takes us up to the actual theft of the train, and the second takes us all the way through some very dramatic prison escapes to where these train engines are today.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

nevver:

August 16, 1977 - Elvis leaves the building

Tags: History Elvis

missedinhistory:

hen we asked for suggestions for happier history stories not long ago, we got a fair number of responses that were closer to “deeply upsetting” than “sunshine and unicorns” on the subject spectrum. Fortunately, Randy not only suggested longitude, but he also followed it with eight exclamation points. While not a 100 percent happy story, the story of longitude, and of European efforts to figure out how to calculate it, features inventions, clocks and shipwrecks – but mostly their prevention, not their carnage and loss. So: Randy wins.

Here’s a link to our notes and research on longitude, including, as promised, links on how to find your latitude.

missedinhistory:

The Teatro alla Scala is one of the most renowned opera houses in the world, and is Italy’s crown jewel of the arts. Even if you have only a passing knowledge of opera, odds are, you know a name connected to the history of this legendary cultural hub.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

In today’s episode: This guy sold the Eiffel Tower. Never mind that he did not own it at the time.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

Today’s episode draws from multiple, different requests from lots of listeners: It’s a brief history of colors, from simple and easily available pigments to dyes made from tens of thousands of snails.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

Early in the 1900s, Quaker Puffed Rice and Quaker Puffed Wheat were “The Cereal Shot From Guns.” Really. Here’s a commercial as proof. The slogan had to do with how the puffed grain cereals were made, and yet, for some unfathomable reason, it also eventually stopped doing the job of selling them. Quaker needed another plan, and turned to the novel idea of giving away tiny plots of land in exchange for box tops. I don’t have a commercial for that one, but I do have today’s episode.

Here’s a link to notes and research.