In memoriam: Albert Einstein passed away on April 18, 1955. E=mc². The theory of relativity. An understanding of the speed of light. The idea that led to the completion of the atomic bomb. All of this came from one man’s brain. Read on to learn How Einstein’s Brain Worked. 

(Image: Einstein accepting U.S. citizenship certificate from judge Phillip Forman, 1940.)

In memoriam: Albert Einstein passed away on April 18, 1955. E=mc². The theory of relativity. An understanding of the speed of light. The idea that led to the completion of the atomic bomb. All of this came from one man’s brain. Read on to learn How Einstein’s Brain Worked

(Image: Einstein accepting U.S. citizenship certificate from judge Phillip Forman, 1940.)

okkultmotionpictures:

EXCERPTS >|< Stone Age Tools (1947)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: Wellcome Library
 | Download: Ogg | 512Kb MPEG4 | MPEG4
 | Digital Copy: attribution-non commercial 3.0 US


A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Stone Age Tools, a demonstration by M. Leon Coutier, archaeologist and former President of the Societe Prehistorique Francaise, of his technique for making replicas of Palaeolithic tools and weapons, including hand-axes, scrapers, gravers and flint arrowheads. Filmed at the former Institute of Archaeology, Regent’s Park, London in June 1947. An important archeological record.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE.




Excerpts by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from out-of-copyright/unknown/rare/controversial moving images. 
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

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missedinhistory:

What’s more fun than a historical character associated with an elixir of youth, time travel, immortality, alchemy and royalty? The count got around in his own time, but his post-mortem legend has legs of its own.

Show notes are here.

How Did We Start Paying Income Tax?

The U.S. tax system is notoriously complex, but how did it end up this way? And what are the alternative ideas? Learn more about the bizarre evolution of taxes in this episode of BrainStuff.

nprfreshair:

102 years ago tonight the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank less than three hours later. 
Take a look at this photo series from Retronaut highlighting the construction of the ship. 

nprfreshair:

102 years ago tonight the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank less than three hours later. 

Take a look at this photo series from Retronaut highlighting the construction of the ship. 

(via npr)

sci-universe:

53 years ago today (April 12), Yuri Gagarin, a Soviet pilot and cosmonaut, became the first human to travel into space and change history, when his Vostok spacecraft completed an orbit of the Earth.

So on April 12, Gagarin, who turned into an international celebrity and hero, is being commemorated for paving the way for future space exploration by the International Day of Human Space Flight (Cosmonautics Day).

I really recommend looking him up. There’s so much to know about him and the history-making flight.

My favourite thing is probably the landing to an unplanned site: A farmer and her daughter observed the strange scene of a figure in a bright orange suit with a large white helmet landing near them by parachute. Gagarin later recalled, “When they saw me in my space suit and the parachute dragging alongside as I walked, they started to back away in fear. I told them, don’t be afraid, I am a Soviet citizen like you, who has descended from space and I must find a telephone to call Moscow!”

Happy International Day of Human Space Flight!

thats-the-way-it-was:

April 12, 1961: The first man in space.
Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin becomes the first human being to travel into space aboard the spacecraft Vostok 1.  The 27-year-old test pilot also became the first human to orbit the planet. Guided by an automatic control system, Vostok 1 orbited Earth in 89 minutes at a maximum speed of 187 miles an hour. 
Gagarin became a worldwide celebrity and was awarded the Order of Lenin and given the title of Hero of the Soviet Union. Streets were named and monuments created in his honor.
Gagarin died died seven years later in a routine jet test flight. His ashes are buried inside the Kremlin walls.
Photo:  Rolls Press/Heritage Images/Getty Images

thats-the-way-it-was:

April 12, 1961: The first man in space.

Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin becomes the first human being to travel into space aboard the spacecraft Vostok 1.  The 27-year-old test pilot also became the first human to orbit the planet. Guided by an automatic control system, Vostok 1 orbited Earth in 89 minutes at a maximum speed of 187 miles an hour. 

Gagarin became a worldwide celebrity and was awarded the Order of Lenin and given the title of Hero of the Soviet Union. Streets were named and monuments created in his honor.

Gagarin died died seven years later in a routine jet test flight. His ashes are buried inside the Kremlin walls.

Photo:  Rolls Press/Heritage Images/Getty Images

thats-the-way-it-was:

April 12, 1981: STS-1 Columbia, the first Space Shuttle, is launched at Cape Kennedy, Florida.
Columbia orbited Earth 37 times during it’s 54.5-hour mission carrying a two man crew - mission commander John  W. Young and pilot Robert L. Crippen.  The ultimate launch date of STS-1 fell on the 20th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin’s Vostok 1, the first manned spaceflight.
IMAX cameras filmed the launch, landing, and mission control during the flight, for the 1982 film entitled Hail Columbia!
Photo: NASA

thats-the-way-it-was:

April 12, 1981: STS-1 Columbia, the first Space Shuttle, is launched at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

Columbia orbited Earth 37 times during it’s 54.5-hour mission carrying a two man crew - mission commander John  W. Young and pilot Robert L. Crippen.  The ultimate launch date of STS-1 fell on the 20th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin’s Vostok 1, the first manned spaceflight.

IMAX cameras filmed the launch, landing, and mission control during the flight, for the 1982 film entitled Hail Columbia!

Photo: NASA

policymic:

"Jesus’ Wife" artifact found to be authentic

Dubbed “The Gospel of Jesus’ Wife,” the papyrus was first unveiled in 2012 by Karen L. King, a historian at Harvard Divinity School. Almost immediately, she was assailed with claims that the artifact was poor forgery, and a team of researchers from Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Columbia and Australia’s Macquarie University have been working since then to assess the authenticity of the papyrus, the ink, the writing style and the calligraphy. On Thursday, they finally published their conclusion: The papyrus is “an ancient document, dating between the sixth to ninth centuries CE.”
The background: The papyrus fragment contains the phrase, “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife…’” There is also reference to a Mary, and the idea that “she will be able to be my disciple.”
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

"Jesus’ Wife" artifact found to be authentic

Dubbed “The Gospel of Jesus’ Wife,” the papyrus was first unveiled in 2012 by Karen L. King, a historian at Harvard Divinity School. Almost immediately, she was assailed with claims that the artifact was poor forgery, and a team of researchers from Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Columbia and Australia’s Macquarie University have been working since then to assess the authenticity of the papyrus, the ink, the writing style and the calligraphy. On Thursday, they finally published their conclusion: The papyrus is “an ancient document, dating between the sixth to ninth centuries CE.”

The background: The papyrus fragment contains the phrase, “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife…’” There is also reference to a Mary, and the idea that “she will be able to be my disciple.”

Read moreFollow policymic

missedinhistory:

Our episode today comes from the listener suggestion box: Katy wrote to us way back in August of 2013 to recommend that we look into the Pig War. And oh, how glad I am that she did. Essentially, in 1859, the United States and the British Empire very nearly got into a shooting war over somebody killing somebody else’s pig. It was all part of a much bigger border dispute between the U.S. and Canada, but it’s a story of egos and posturing and a conflict that would have been completely prevented had the telephone been in common use.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

missedinhistory:

Today’s episode has some themes in common with our recent story on Crown Prince Sado of Korea, including a royal family with a history of mental health issues and an ultimately murderous end. This time, it’s from Sweden. Eric XIV’s doesn’t lend itself to a straightforward, chronological telling, so today’s episode is thematic, winding through his childhood, his courtships with a number of princesses, and the murders that ended it all.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

nevver:

The Dream is over - April 4th, 1968