theatlantic:

Why Don’t More Women Want to Work with Other Women?

Most Americans don’t care about the gender of their coworkers, but those who do prefer men by a wide margin.
Read more. [Image: MariusBoatca/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Why Don’t More Women Want to Work with Other Women?

Most Americans don’t care about the gender of their coworkers, but those who do prefer men by a wide margin.

Read more. [Image: MariusBoatca/Flickr]

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Why Men Love Reddit

If Reddit users are 74 percent male, what is it about the aggregator’s architecture of the aggregator that appeals to the masculine masses? Two words: up vote.

knives-in-the-drain:

Today in Women in STEM Fields: The Struggle, The Life, a study conducted by University College London’s Infectious Disease Research Network has found that U.K. female scientists working on infectious diseases are far less likely to receive grants than their male counterparts. And when they do

(Source: themarysue.com, via knivesies-deactivated20140101)

buzzfeed:

The NYFA released this inforaphic of gender inequality in film. It’s truly eye-opening and this only scratches the surface.

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Episode: Do women apologize more than men?

Hollywood icon John Wayne once said, “Never apologize. It’s a sign of weakness.” Is that masculine advice why it’s thought that women tend to apologize more than men? Caroline and Cristen examine how men and women say “I’m sorry,” and myth-bust the stereotype of women as the sorrier sex.

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Ye olde gender fluidity.
(via)

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Ye olde gender fluidity.

(via)

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

5 Feminist Halloween Costume Ideas

Who says you can’t dress up as the gender wage gap?!

Parenting - you’re doing it right. The comment reads: “Back in October my 7yo Son broke his arm. When the doctor asked him what color cast he wanted, my son proudly pointed to the hot pink one. The Doctor was like are you sure? Pink is a girl color… My little guy looked at the Doc and said “There are no girl colors or boy colors, I want a PINK cast because it’s Breast Cancer Month.” The Doc turned red, the Nurse gave my son a kiss and I puffed out like a proud Mama bird.”

Parenting - you’re doing it right. The comment reads: “Back in October my 7yo Son broke his arm. When the doctor asked him what color cast he wanted, my son proudly pointed to the hot pink one. The Doctor was like are you sure? Pink is a girl color… My little guy looked at the Doc and said “There are no girl colors or boy colors, I want a PINK cast because it’s Breast Cancer Month.” The Doc turned red, the Nurse gave my son a kiss and I puffed out like a proud Mama bird.”

(Source: likeanoceanbeingwarmedbythesun)

"We raise our little boys to view their bodies as tools to master their environments. We raise our little girls to view their bodies as projects to constantly be improved."

The Sexy Lie: Caroline Heldman at TEDxYouth@SanDiego (via mortari)

As a woman/ former girl, I can attest to the sad truth in that. And that’s part of the reason why Stuff Mom Never Told You is so important to me. It’s may way to doing right by the younger girls and women out there: to educate myself alongside them about self-acceptance, confidence and agency through intellectual empowerment. /Cristen

(via stuffmomnevertoldyou)

(Source: abigail-rising, via stuffmomnevertoldyou)

wildcat2030:

Where’s the male Pill?
Many promising male contraceptives are in development, but none has come to market. So why has it taken so long? 
-
….The arrival of the birth control pill in the 1960s was hailed as a social revolution that decoupled sexuality from reproduction. It empowered women by giving them true reproductive control, because it allowed for reliable and reversible contraception. Women could delay or prevent reproduction without having to abstain from sex, and they could discontinue usage if they wanted to have a child. Over the years, many additional female contraceptives have been developed so that women today can choose from pills, injections, patches or intrauterine devices — many of which are even more reliable than those of the 1960s. By contrast, the choices for male contraception are far more limited: it’s either sterilisation (a vasectomy) or condoms. Vasectomy has been used since the late 19th century, while the condom has an even longer linage. In the 16th century, the Italian anatomist Gabriello Fallopio described a condom made out of a linen sheath, used to prevent the transmission of syphilis. By the 18th century, condoms were prized as male contraceptives, and were even mentioned by the Italian adventurer Giacomo Casanova, who described them as ‘English Overcoats’. (via Why is there still no male contraceptive pill? – Jalees Rehman – Aeon)

wildcat2030:

Where’s the male Pill?

Many promising male contraceptives are in development, but none has come to market. So why has it taken so long?

-

….The arrival of the birth control pill in the 1960s was hailed as a social revolution that decoupled sexuality from reproduction. It empowered women by giving them true reproductive control, because it allowed for reliable and reversible contraception. Women could delay or prevent reproduction without having to abstain from sex, and they could discontinue usage if they wanted to have a child. Over the years, many additional female contraceptives have been developed so that women today can choose from pills, injections, patches or intrauterine devices — many of which are even more reliable than those of the 1960s. By contrast, the choices for male contraception are far more limited: it’s either sterilisation (a vasectomy) or condoms. Vasectomy has been used since the late 19th century, while the condom has an even longer linage. In the 16th century, the Italian anatomist Gabriello Fallopio described a condom made out of a linen sheath, used to prevent the transmission of syphilis. By the 18th century, condoms were prized as male contraceptives, and were even mentioned by the Italian adventurer Giacomo Casanova, who described them as ‘English Overcoats’. (via Why is there still no male contraceptive pill? – Jalees Rehman – Aeon)

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Episode: Is kleptomania a female disorder?

Why are two-thirds of diagnosed kleptomaniacs women? Cristen and Caroline explore the 19th-century rise of retail consumerism, shoplifting and how kleptomania was invented to help keep wealthy women out of prison.

Bonus fact: Jane Austen’s aunt was one of the first high-profile female thieving cases in Britain.