npr:

Credit: Bianca Glaever and Alix Spiegel/NPR

"Mind Over Milkshake: How Your Thoughts Fool Your Stomach"

stufftoblowyourmind:

Pink slime in your meat? Check. Maggots in your mushrooms? Yes, please! Find out what else is dwelling in the food supply as Julie takes you through part two of the disgusting food facts tour.

Ben Bowlin from Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know brought in amazing doughnuts for everyone this morning. Really hoping not to wake up missing a kidney in a dark alley after this.

Ben Bowlin from Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know brought in amazing doughnuts for everyone this morning. Really hoping not to wake up missing a kidney in a dark alley after this.

stufftoblowyourmind:

10 Disgusting Food Facts: Part 1 — Epic Science

Take a tour through some truly barf-worthy food facts. Julie gives you a point/counterpoint lowdown on the stuff you find in fast food, as well as the cans in your cupboard.

(Source: stufftoblowyourmind.com)

policymic:

The surprising history of Nutella

We owe a lot of our everyday modern conveniences to inventions from World War II: radar, penicillin, computers, and even nutella.
True fact: In the 1940s Pietro Ferrero was a pastry-maker in the Piedmont region of Italy, and rationing was putting a squeeze on everyone’s supply of cocoa. Hazelnuts are a big feature of the Piedmontese economy, and Ferrero probably knew about gianduia, a kind of chocolate spread invented in nearby Turin during the Napoleonic Era.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

The surprising history of Nutella

We owe a lot of our everyday modern conveniences to inventions from World War II: radar, penicillin, computers, and even nutella.

True fact: In the 1940s Pietro Ferrero was a pastry-maker in the Piedmont region of Italy, and rationing was putting a squeeze on everyone’s supply of cocoa. Hazelnuts are a big feature of the Piedmontese economy, and Ferrero probably knew about gianduia, a kind of chocolate spread invented in nearby Turin during the Napoleonic Era.

Read more | Follow policymic

kateoplis:

"Forty-one million IQ points. That’s what Dr. David Bellinger determined Americans have collectively forfeited as a result of exposure to lead, mercury, and organophosphate pesticides. In a 2012 paper published by the National Institutes of Health, Bellinger, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, compared intelligence quotients among children whose mothers had been exposed to these neurotoxins while pregnant to those who had not. Bellinger calculates a total loss of 16.9 million IQ points due to exposure to organophosphates, the most common pesticides used in agriculture.”

This “silent pandemic” of toxins is believed to be “causing not just lower IQs, but ADHD and autism spectrum disorder.”

The Toxins That Threaten Our Brains | The Atlantic

 

cracked:

Yet another reason you should stick to eating processed foods.
7 Normal Things That Become Horror Movies Under a Microscope

#7. A Strawberry Is a Hellish Alien Hive
Put a strawberry under an electron microscope and suddenly it’s a production still from the gritty reboot of Aliens. Those white egg-like structures are actually the strawberry pips, which are called achenes. They’re the true fruit of the strawberry plant, lounging around in the fleshy leftover carrier blob that we have taken to eating. The hairs are there because strawberries just happen to have hair.
Straight up hair.

Read More

cracked:

Yet another reason you should stick to eating processed foods.

7 Normal Things That Become Horror Movies Under a Microscope

#7. A Strawberry Is a Hellish Alien Hive

Put a strawberry under an electron microscope and suddenly it’s a production still from the gritty reboot of Aliens. Those white egg-like structures are actually the strawberry pips, which are called achenes. They’re the true fruit of the strawberry plant, lounging around in the fleshy leftover carrier blob that we have taken to eating. The hairs are there because strawberries just happen to have hair.

Straight up hair.

Read More

skeptv:

The Chemistry of Sriracha: Hot Sauce Science

Forget ketchup and mustard — Sriracha might be the world’s new favorite condiment. Beloved by millions for its unique spicy, garlicky, slightly sweet flavor, the chemistry of “rooster sauce” is the focus of our latest video.

Video by Kirk Zamieroski
Series created by Adam Dylewski
Produced by the American Chemical Society

via Reactions.

huffingtonpost:

So apparently, we’ve been eating sushi all wrong.

(Source: youtube.com)

How Does Making Bread Work?

In this episode of BrainStuff, Lauren explores what’s actually happening when we make bread. Hint: It involves plenty of yeast, trapping carbon dioxide and linking gluten molecules.