10 Completely Wrong Ways to Use Commas

10. In the classic movie “The Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy is played by Judy Garland.

9. He was born in January, 1990.

8. 14 January, 1990

7. The president’s son was named John F. Kennedy, Jr.

6. Many men want to be the spy, James Bond.

5. Some alcoholic beverages, such as, margaritas and daiquiris, can have as many calories as a burger.

4. She hated going to the dentist, and cried the whole way there.

3. The woman took her son, and her nephew to a course on safe driving.

2. She hated going to the dentist, and, she cried the whole way there.

1. I want to go, I want to stay.

Click to find out why… 

Don’t Be Dumb: Ye or The? » Stuff You Should Know

If you’ve ever pronounced the word “ye” (as in “ye olde lolcat”) to sound like “yee,” you’ve fallen for an old trick of Olde English — the now-defunct letter called the thorn. So get with it and stop sounding like a reject from the Renaissance Fair. Josh Clark (of Stuff Ye Should Know — in which “ye” is actually pronounced “yee”) explains how.

ilovecharts:

22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other
via moosespringsteen

10 Completely Wrong Ways to Use Commas

Happy Grammar Day to those of you currently experiencing March 4th! We come bearing helpful American English comma tips.

kidsneedscience:

If you haven’t looked at the calendar yet today, it is a special day that won’t be repeated for a century:  12/12/12.  The word twelve was early in the English language, forming in Old English as twelf literally meaning two left (over ten) as far back as the twelfth century!  This system of counting came from the Proto Germanic formation *twa-lif-, a compound word formed by combining the root for two (*twa) and *lif-, which was the verb to leave.  English has a stronger echo of to leave in the number eleven.  Many Northern European languages adopted this formation:  Old Saxon had twelif, Old Norse tolf, Old Frisian twelef, Middle Dutch twalef, and so on. 

kidsneedscience:

If you haven’t looked at the calendar yet today, it is a special day that won’t be repeated for a century:  12/12/12.  The word twelve was early in the English language, forming in Old English as twelf literally meaning two left (over ten) as far back as the twelfth century!  This system of counting came from the Proto Germanic formation *twa-lif-, a compound word formed by combining the root for two (*twa) and *lif-, which was the verb to leave.  English has a stronger echo of to leave in the number eleven.  Many Northern European languages adopted this formation:  Old Saxon had twelif, Old Norse tolf, Old Frisian twelef, Middle Dutch twalef, and so on. 

(via scinerds)

10 Completely Wrong Ways to Use Commas
Commas are some of the most often misused punctuation marks, and with good reason. The rules that guide when and when not to insert a comma can be a bit clouded in terminology and exceptions. So often, though, it comes down to one question: Is it essential? 
If bad punctuation drive you nuts, then read on for 10 completely wrong ways to use commas that everyone should know

10 Completely Wrong Ways to Use Commas

Commas are some of the most often misused punctuation marks, and with good reason. The rules that guide when and when not to insert a comma can be a bit clouded in terminology and exceptions. So often, though, it comes down to one question: Is it essential? 

If bad punctuation drive you nuts, then read on for 10 completely wrong ways to use commas that everyone should know