huffingtonpost:

This Is How Much The Female Portrait Has Evolved In The Last 500 Years

Art history books have a reputation of showcasing dead, white, European males — DWEM — and the (mostly white) women they handpicked as muses. Portrait after portrait reveals a woman’s face through a man’s gaze, casting a rather unsavory light on the tendency of artists to eroticize, objectify or idolize the female form.

See the full video for a striking look at the female portrait.

(Souce:  artFido)

newsweek:

Machine Learning Algorithm Studying Fine Art Paintings Sees Things Art Historians Had Never Noticed

directedbychuckjones:

Tex Avery died August 26, 1980. This tribute by Chuck Jones was published in the Sunday, August 31, 1980 Los Angeles Tribune Calendar section. (Bottom: photographic negative of an original Tex Avery Bugs Bunny model sheet.)

"What Tex taught me was this:

"1. You must love what you caricature. You must not mock it—unless it is ridiculously self-important.

"2. You must learn to respect that golden atom, that single-frame of action, that 1/24th of a second, because the difference between lightning and the lightning bug may hinge on that single frame.

"3. You must respect the impulsive thought and try to implement it. You cannot perform as a director by what you already know, you must depend on the flash of inspiration that you do not expect and do not know. 

"4. You must remember always that only man, of all creatures, can blush, or needs to; that only a man can laugh, or needs to, and that if you are in that trade of helping others to laugh and to survive by laughter, then you are privileged indeed.

"5. Remember always that character is all that matters in the making of great comedians in animation and in live-action.

"6. Keep always in your mind, your heart and your hand that timing is the essence, the spine, and the electrical magic of humor—and of animation."

Artist EC Steiner (casketglass) came by the studio to drop off some fantastic creations. Expect to see these faces in future “Monster Science” episodes from Stuff to Blow Your Mind and in other Stuff shows!

Artist EC Steiner (casketglass) came by the studio to drop off some fantastic creations. Expect to see these faces in future “Monster Science” episodes from Stuff to Blow Your Mind and in other Stuff shows!

fastcodesign:

4 Things You Didn’t Know About Chuck Jones, Brilliant Creator Of Road Runner And Wile E. Coyote
Most six-year-olds addicted to Saturday morning cartoons don’t know much about the man behind beloved characters like Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner, or about the painstaking work that went into making Bugs Bunny chomp carrots and say “What’s Up, Doc?” For three decades, animation director and artist Charles Martin “Chuck” Jones was the mastermind behind these mania-filled classic cartoons. The Animation Art of Chuck Jones, a new exhibit at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image, celebrates his creative genius. It features 23 of the 300 animated films he directed, including How the Grinch Stole Christmas, as well as 125 original sketches, storyboards, animation cels, and photographs. Here, four things you probably didn’t know about Jones, who died in 2002:
Read More>

fastcodesign:

4 Things You Didn’t Know About Chuck Jones, Brilliant Creator Of Road Runner And Wile E. Coyote

Most six-year-olds addicted to Saturday morning cartoons don’t know much about the man behind beloved characters like Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner, or about the painstaking work that went into making Bugs Bunny chomp carrots and say “What’s Up, Doc?” For three decades, animation director and artist Charles Martin “Chuck” Jones was the mastermind behind these mania-filled classic cartoons. The Animation Art of Chuck Jones, a new exhibit at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image, celebrates his creative genius. It features 23 of the 300 animated films he directed, including How the Grinch Stole Christmas, as well as 125 original sketches, storyboards, animation cels, and photographs. Here, four things you probably didn’t know about Jones, who died in 2002:

Read More>

archiemcphee:

Noel Cruz is a doll repaint artist, and an awesome one at that. He’s loved drawing and painting characters from his favorite TV shows since childhood, in particular Lindsay Wagner as Jaime Sommers in The Bionic Woman. But it wasn’t until Cruz first encountered a repainted doll on eBay, thanks to his wife who’s a doll collector, that he thought, “Hey, I could do this too!” And now he’s one of the best in the doll painting community.

It took time and lots of practice for Cruz to adapt his skills from painting on wide, flat canvases to small, smooth plastic doll faces. Today his ability to transform factory-painted character and celebrity dolls into impeccably detailed, lifelike resemblances of the actual people on which they were based puts the original dolls to shame. Accomplishing this feat requires many photos of the famous person/character, plenty of time, and a great deal of skill.

To check out more of his stunning repainted dolls, check out Noel Cruz’s website and Facebook page. You can also follow him via Instagram and right here on Tumblr at noelcruzcreations. And, if you’ve got an urge to own one of his dolls, keep an eye on Cruz’s eBay auction listings.

[via RocketNews24]

micdotcom:

Carol Rosetti’s illustrations are a powerful reminder women are in control of their own bodies

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

See more of her work | Follow micdotcom

Powerful (and empowering) stuff! 

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Modern Remakes of Famous Paintings

The amount of feels this post gives us! We all probably know these beloved Western art masterpieces, but not like this! Here are 20 great examples of classic paintings that have been reproduced creatively by a few very creative art lovers with photo cameras.

Read More

(via npr)