micdotcom:

Carol Rosetti’s illustrations are a powerful reminder women are in control of their own bodies

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

See more of her work | Follow micdotcom

Powerful (and empowering) stuff! 

wapiti3:

Contributions to the knowledge of the quadrupeds of America / by A. Wagner on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Publication info Munich, Germany :Königliche Akademie der Wissenschaften,1847-1849
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

(via scientificillustration)

Retro Future: A Gallery of Futuristic Illustrations from the Past

Ever since people started thinking about the world of the future they’ve been drawing pictures of it. Here are a few wonderful examples of the images of the future from the past. 

See more at Stuff You Should Know

mymodernmet:

Coloring my kids art by Tatsputin

A dad lovingly colors in his kids’ drawings while on out-of-state business trips.

mymodernmet:

Notorious Baldies by Mr. Peruca

Fun set of illustrations spotlighting famous bald heads throughout pop culture.

explore-blog:


We lost Addams Family creator Charles Addams 25 years ago today – did you know he illustrated Mother Goose? And it’s grimly great.

explore-blog:

We lost Addams Family creator Charles Addams 25 years ago today – did you know he illustrated Mother Goose? And it’s grimly great.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

archiemcphee:

The creative folks over at Maptia have illustrated 11 fascinating words from other cultures which have no direct English translation, but still express feelings, sights, and experiences to which we can all relate.

These are just a few of our favourites. Click here to see them all.

[via Design Taxi]

mucholderthen:

Zoology - Invertebrata - Mollusca - Helix pomatia
Vintage anatomical illustrations of the escargot, or edible snail

The Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague has a unique collection of teaching aids, pictorial boards collected over the decades — back to the 19th century.  

Because of their precision and their artistry, these vintage illustrations can still be used.  The main way in which some of the illustrations conflict with current understanding is in the area of phylogenetic classification.

(from Zoology E-Learning)

Further slug reading listening from Stuff to Blow Your Mind: Tales of Slime in the Animal Kingdom, covering snails, slugs, and hag fish; My Slimey Valentine: The Slug Life, covering slug sex. And comparing it to Cirque de Soleil. Yup.

(via scientificillustration)

How Disc Brakes Work:

Most modern cars have disc brakes on the front wheels, and some have disc brakes on all four wheels. This is the part of the brake system that does the actual work of stopping the car.

The most common type of disc brake on modern cars is the single-piston floating caliper, which is what you’re looking at here.

The main components of a disc brake are:

  • The brake pads
  • The caliper, which contains a piston
  • The rotor, which is mounted to the hub

The disc brake is a lot like the brakes on a bicycle. Bicycle brakes have a caliper, which squeezes the brake pads against the wheel. In a disc brake, the brake pads squeeze the rotor instead of the wheel, and the force is transmitted hydraulically instead of through a cable. Friction between the pads and the disc slows the disc down.

A moving car has a certain amount of kinetic energy, and the brakes have to remove this energy from the car in order to stop it. How do the brakes do this? Each time you stop your car, your brakes convert the kinetic energy to heat generated by the friction between the pads and the disc. Most car disc brakes are vented.

Keep reading…

mucholderthen:

CELL ON THE HALF SHELL
(via Cell | Medgraphik)

mucholderthen:

CELL ON THE HALF SHELL

(via Cell | Medgraphik)

(via scientificillustration)

biomedicalephemera:

Man, and the Lion
Both the anatomist and the artist can see here the vast difference in forelimb and hindlimb structure between the lion and man (provided solely for comparison). The forelimb of the lion is far thicker and sturdier than that of man, but the digits and bone layout are very much alike, save that the lion has but four digits on the hindlimb.
In the forelimbs, the lion has pronounced bony sheaths for its retractile claws, which form a very visible rounded enlargement at the end of the end of each toe. These are not nearly as evident on the hindlimbs, where a very slight indication of the claw can be seen at the end of the digit. Other things important to note are the tooth structure and arrangement, and what teeth are showing when a lion is attacking.
Together, the size and weight of the front limbs and their corresponding muscles, along with the teeth and jaws, can be said to be the characteristic points of the lion. The hind limbs, slender neck, vertebral column, and ribs, are only suggestive of the agility which allows this animal to use his front limbs and jaws with such power as to have rendered the figure of the Lion a symbol of strength, power, and destruction.
A Comparative View of the Human and Animal Frame. B. Waterhouse Hawkins, 1860.

biomedicalephemera:

Man, and the Lion

Both the anatomist and the artist can see here the vast difference in forelimb and hindlimb structure between the lion and man (provided solely for comparison). The forelimb of the lion is far thicker and sturdier than that of man, but the digits and bone layout are very much alike, save that the lion has but four digits on the hindlimb.

In the forelimbs, the lion has pronounced bony sheaths for its retractile claws, which form a very visible rounded enlargement at the end of the end of each toe. These are not nearly as evident on the hindlimbs, where a very slight indication of the claw can be seen at the end of the digit. Other things important to note are the tooth structure and arrangement, and what teeth are showing when a lion is attacking.

Together, the size and weight of the front limbs and their corresponding muscles, along with the teeth and jaws, can be said to be the characteristic points of the lion. The hind limbs, slender neck, vertebral column, and ribs, are only suggestive of the agility which allows this animal to use his front limbs and jaws with such power as to have rendered the figure of the Lion a symbol of strength, power, and destruction.

A Comparative View of the Human and Animal Frame. B. Waterhouse Hawkins, 1860.

(via biomedicalephemera)

theolduvaigorge:

Digital Reconstructions of Hominids from the set ‘Descendenteí,’ Human Kind Lineage Project

Identification:

Click through for full sequential soft tissue facial reconstruction posters from The Human Kind Lineage Project

(Source: Behance.net)

(via stufftoblowyourmind)