missedinhistory:

Seventy-six years ago today, the Hindenburg crashed while attempting to land in New Jersey. It was making its return to flight after a winter of refitting, which followed a season of successful round trips across the ocean. In this episode, we explore the Hindenburg’s whole history, and why it put an end to the airship as a mode of travel.

(Source: missedinhistory)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

May 6, 1937: The Hindenburg Crashes
On this day in 1937, the Hindenburg, a Nazi hydrogen filled airship, burst into flames as it attempted to land at New Jersey’s Lakehurt Navy Air Base. The airship had departed from Frankfurt, Germany and carried 36 passengers and sixty-one crew members.
As the airship was landing, it burst into flames and began to fall 200 feet to the ground. Thirty-five people lost their lives, while others suffered major injuries.
Many people still argue on what caused the disaster, from engine failure to sabotage. Think you know? Explore this diagram of the Hindenburg and see if you can come up with any theories.
Also, check out this episode of History Detectives to find out if someone actually managed to salvage an item from the Hindenburg disaster.
Image: A photo captures the Hindenburg as it crashes in an airfield at NAS Lakehurst, N.J., at 7:25 p.m., May 6, 1937. (U.S. Navy file photo)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

May 6, 1937: The Hindenburg Crashes

On this day in 1937, the Hindenburg, a Nazi hydrogen filled airship, burst into flames as it attempted to land at New Jersey’s Lakehurt Navy Air Base. The airship had departed from Frankfurt, Germany and carried 36 passengers and sixty-one crew members.

As the airship was landing, it burst into flames and began to fall 200 feet to the ground. Thirty-five people lost their lives, while others suffered major injuries.

Many people still argue on what caused the disaster, from engine failure to sabotage. Think you know? Explore this diagram of the Hindenburg and see if you can come up with any theories.

Also, check out this episode of History Detectives to find out if someone actually managed to salvage an item from the Hindenburg disaster.

Image: A photo captures the Hindenburg as it crashes in an airfield at NAS Lakehurst, N.J., at 7:25 p.m., May 6, 1937. (U.S. Navy file photo)

thats-the-way-it-was:

March 4, 1936: First flight of LZ 129 Hindenburg
Five years after construction began in 1931, the Hindenburg made its maiden test flight from the Zeppelin dockyards at Friedrichshafen on March 4, 1936, with 87 passengers and crew aboard.
Photo: Fox Photo/Getty

thats-the-way-it-was:

March 4, 1936: First flight of LZ 129 Hindenburg

Five years after construction began in 1931, the Hindenburg made its maiden test flight from the Zeppelin dockyards at Friedrichshafen on March 4, 1936, with 87 passengers and crew aboard.

Photo: Fox Photo/Getty