ourpresidents:

FDR’s First Fireside Chat
Today in history, March 12, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered his first Fireside Chat. Using the radio to speak directly to the nation, FDR laid out his plan to address the banking crisis of the Great Depression.  
Watch archival footage from the FDR Presidential Library here.
More — President Roosevelt’s Fireside Chats
-from the FDR Library 

ourpresidents:

FDR’s First Fireside Chat

Today in history, March 12, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered his first Fireside Chat. Using the radio to speak directly to the nation, FDR laid out his plan to address the banking crisis of the Great Depression.  

Watch archival footage from the FDR Presidential Library here.

More — President Roosevelt’s Fireside Chats

-from the FDR Library 

todayinhistory:

October 11th 1884: Eleanor Roosevelt born

On this day in 1884 Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City. She married her cousin Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1905. Eleanor was actively involved in her husband’s political career, and encouraged him to continue in politics after his partial paralysis from polio in 1921. Franklin was elected President of the United States in 1932 and served as President from 1933 until his death in 1945. Eleanor was a very active First Lady, openly campaigning for greater rights for women and African Americans. After FDR’s death, Eleanor was a US delegate to the United Nations, and chaired the UN Commission on Human Rights. In this capacity she oversaw the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Eleanor Roosevelt died in 1962 aged 78.

(via missedinhistory)

coolchicksfromhistory:

todaysdocument:

Frances Perkins: First Woman Cabinet member

80 years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt notified the U.S. Senate on March 4, 1933, that he had nominated Frances Perkins of New York to be Secretary of Labor.  A lifelong labor reformer, she rose to prominence following the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. She was confirmed as Secretary of Labor and became the first woman appointed to a Cabinet position. She was the longest serving Labor secretary, serving for 12 years between 1933 and 1945. She was also the first woman to enter the Presidential Line of Succession.

Keep reading at Prologue: A Factory Fire and Frances Perkins

Johnny: What’s your real name, Baby? 
Baby: Frances. For the first woman in the Cabinet. 

Dirty Dancing

usnatarchives:

At 79 years old, Forest Delano Roosevelt Ferguson did not remember what he wrote to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt at age eight. But his daughter thought there might be a way to find out.

With Dad unable to recollect exactly what he wrote to the President, the mystery rooted in me and started sprouting. What if I could find that letter after all these years?

During an Internet search, a website for the FDR Library and Museum appeared. “The perfect starting point,” I celebrated. “They have archives! I wonder if … oh, probably not. But maybe. Worth a try.”

I sent an email to the archival contact listed on the web site and waited. Within a week and a half, my inbox had a message waiting for me. I opened “Response From FDR Library Inquiry” and read the first paragraph.

For the full story—and a surprise find—go today’s Pieces of History Blog.

How the U.S. President Works

George Washington was aware his actions would be reviewed for centuries to come; he wrote that his foray into the first presidency was like “entering upon an unexplored field, enveloped on every side with clouds and darkness.” Washington had no model on which to base his actions, and every decision he made would set precedent for presidents to come.

To fully understand what a president does and how he or she does it, it’s important to view a president not as an incumbent holding office for four or eight years, but as a part of a larger organism, the presidency itself. The office is a dynamic, ever-evolving thing that’s molded, carved, expanded upon, battered and made different by every person who holds it. The presidency, in other words, is larger than any single president.

Keep reading….

usnatarchives:

After the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was some doubt that the White House Christmas Tree lighting ceremony would take place at all.
The Roosevelts had planned for a “more homey” lighting of the National Christmas tree on December 24 in 1941, and so FDR had directed that the tree be moved from the Ellipse to the White House grounds, just next to the South Lawn Fountain. But with firm backing from the President, the tree-lighting went forward, and thousands came to the White House to share a bright moment of hope during dark and uncertain times.

President Roosevelt reminded the audience, “Our strongest weapon against this war is the conviction of the dignity and brotherhood of man which Christmas Day signifies—more than any other day or any other symbol.” He continued, “Against enemies who preach the principles of hate and practise them, we set our faith in human love and in God’s care for us and all men everywhere.”

Read the whole story here: http://go.usa.gov/gX8B
Image: President Roosevelt, with Churchill to his right, addresses the crowd at the 1941  lighting of the White House Christmas tree. From the FDR Presidential Library.

usnatarchives:

After the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was some doubt that the White House Christmas Tree lighting ceremony would take place at all.

The Roosevelts had planned for a “more homey” lighting of the National Christmas tree on December 24 in 1941, and so FDR had directed that the tree be moved from the Ellipse to the White House grounds, just next to the South Lawn Fountain.

But with firm backing from the President, the tree-lighting went forward, and thousands came to the White House to share a bright moment of hope during dark and uncertain times.

President Roosevelt reminded the audience, “Our strongest weapon against this war is the conviction of the dignity and brotherhood of man which Christmas Day signifies—more than any other day or any other symbol.” He continued, “Against enemies who preach the principles of hate and practise them, we set our faith in human love and in God’s care for us and all men everywhere.”

Read the whole story here: http://go.usa.gov/gX8B

Image: President Roosevelt, with Churchill to his right, addresses the crowd at the 1941  lighting of the White House Christmas tree. From the FDR Presidential Library.

ourpresidents:

Franklin D. Roosevelt campaigns in Hyde Park, NY.  8/9/20
In 1920, FDR unsuccessfully campaigned for the Democratic Vice-Presidential candidacy.  The men who worked with him on the campaign became his close associates, and would later become known as the Cuff Link Gang.  
 FDR gave each of the men a set of cuff links, one with the person’s initials, and the other with FDR’s. This club then met annually throughout Roosevelt’s life around the time of his birthday, and the parties usually were themed in some way. Other members were added to the club in later years through Roosevelt’s traditional giving of a set of links. Read More
-from the FDR Library

ourpresidents:

Franklin D. Roosevelt campaigns in Hyde Park, NY.  8/9/20

In 1920, FDR unsuccessfully campaigned for the Democratic Vice-Presidential candidacy.  The men who worked with him on the campaign became his close associates, and would later become known as the Cuff Link Gang. 

FDR gave each of the men a set of cuff links, one with the person’s initials, and the other with FDR’s. This club then met annually throughout Roosevelt’s life around the time of his birthday, and the parties usually were themed in some way. Other members were added to the club in later years through Roosevelt’s traditional giving of a set of links. Read More

-from the FDR Library