anukkinearthwalker:

NASA photo of the 33 million people protest in Egypt.

anukkinearthwalker:

NASA photo of the 33 million people protest in Egypt.

(via brooklynmutt)

breakingnews:

Military coup reportedly underway in Egypt
NBC News: Supporters of Egyptian President Morsi say a military coup is underway. 
According to an adviser to Morsi, tanks are on the move outside of Cairo and communication with Morsi has been cut off. 
Follow the latest at Breaking News. 
Photo: Protesters against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi wave flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 3. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

breakingnews:

Military coup reportedly underway in Egypt

NBC News: Supporters of Egyptian President Morsi say a military coup is underway. 

According to an adviser to Morsi, tanks are on the move outside of Cairo and communication with Morsi has been cut off. 

Follow the latest at Breaking News

Photo: Protesters against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi wave flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 3. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

jtotheizzoe:

Iron in Egyptian relics came from space
Humans and iron have a mysterious history. Modern smelting technology has made iron ubiquitous, in the form of steel. But there’s no evidence that ancient cultures knew how to purify, and pound otherwise unusable iron ore (relatively common on Earth) into shapable iron metal.
If that’s the case, then how do we explain the 5,000-year-old relic in the photo above? Meteorites! About 6% of meteorites that hit Earth contain iron.
This ancient Egyptian bead is known as the Gerzeh bead. It was found, along with eight others, in a tomb dating to 3,300 BC. Recent X-ray and electron microscope analysis done by the University of Manchester and The Open University have traced its origins to a falling meteorite, thanks to its particular mix of iron and nickel. Such meteoric iron artifacts have also been found in Iran and China.
Can’t make iron? Get it from space! 
Interestingly, the word “iron” is thought by some to derive from the Proto-Germanic word isarnan, meaning “holy metal”, which may itself derive from an Etruscan word meaning “gods”. It seems that mankind’s earliest experiences with iron originated in the heavens, and they named it accordingly.
Can you imagine what they would have thought if they found this thing? (that’s the Willamette Meteorite):

(more at Nature News)

jtotheizzoe:

Iron in Egyptian relics came from space

Humans and iron have a mysterious history. Modern smelting technology has made iron ubiquitous, in the form of steel. But there’s no evidence that ancient cultures knew how to purify, and pound otherwise unusable iron ore (relatively common on Earth) into shapable iron metal.

If that’s the case, then how do we explain the 5,000-year-old relic in the photo above? Meteorites! About 6% of meteorites that hit Earth contain iron.

This ancient Egyptian bead is known as the Gerzeh bead. It was found, along with eight others, in a tomb dating to 3,300 BC. Recent X-ray and electron microscope analysis done by the University of Manchester and The Open University have traced its origins to a falling meteorite, thanks to its particular mix of iron and nickel. Such meteoric iron artifacts have also been found in Iran and China.

Can’t make iron? Get it from space! 

Interestingly, the word “iron” is thought by some to derive from the Proto-Germanic word isarnan, meaning “holy metal”, which may itself derive from an Etruscan word meaning “gods”. It seems that mankind’s earliest experiences with iron originated in the heavens, and they named it accordingly.

Can you imagine what they would have thought if they found this thing? (that’s the Willamette Meteorite):

(more at Nature News)

nationalpost:

Man goes undercover as a woman to investigate deep-rooted sexual harassment and abuse in EgyptWaleed Hammad dressed conservatively for his secret mission into the world of sexual harassment and abuse on the streets of Cairo, donning a long tan skirt and sleeved shirt, and at times covering his head like many Egyptian women.The 24-year-old actor walked the sidewalks, hidden cameras in tow, for an investigative television report, hoping the broadcast would enlighten national debate about how to combat deep-rooted day-to-day sexual harassment and abuse in this patriarchal society.As he strolled, Hammad, who wore light makeup to conceal hints of facial hair and accentuate his eyes, was hissed at and verbally abused. In one instance — when he was wearing a head veil — he was taken for a prostitute and offered up to $580 for one night.“I can go wherever I want, do whatever I want very simply, very easily, very casually,” Hammad said. “For a woman, it boils down to her having to focus on how she breathes while she is walking. It is not just the walk. It is not just the clothes. It is not what she says or how she looks.” As a woman walking down the street, “you have to be in a constant state of alertness.” (AP Photo / Courtesy of Awel el Kheit)

nationalpost:

Man goes undercover as a woman to investigate deep-rooted sexual harassment and abuse in Egypt
Waleed Hammad dressed conservatively for his secret mission into the world of sexual harassment and abuse on the streets of Cairo, donning a long tan skirt and sleeved shirt, and at times covering his head like many Egyptian women.

The 24-year-old actor walked the sidewalks, hidden cameras in tow, for an investigative television report, hoping the broadcast would enlighten national debate about how to combat deep-rooted day-to-day sexual harassment and abuse in this patriarchal society.

As he strolled, Hammad, who wore light makeup to conceal hints of facial hair and accentuate his eyes, was hissed at and verbally abused. In one instance — when he was wearing a head veil — he was taken for a prostitute and offered up to $580 for one night.

“I can go wherever I want, do whatever I want very simply, very easily, very casually,” Hammad said. “For a woman, it boils down to her having to focus on how she breathes while she is walking. It is not just the walk. It is not just the clothes. It is not what she says or how she looks.” As a woman walking down the street, “you have to be in a constant state of alertness.” (AP Photo / Courtesy of Awel el Kheit)

semiticmuseum:

This is one of many detailed scenes adorning the mummy case of Padimut, a priest and engraver who lived in ancient Thebes in the 22nd Dynasty (945-712 B.C.E.).  Coffin paintings such as this are often self-referential in nature, describing the ideal journey of the deceased through the underworld, the land of Duat; sometimes they even include instructions, much like the mummy texts. 
This scene shows Osiris sitting in judgment of Padimut’s heart, which is being weighed against the Feather of Truth.  The assumption is that if Padimut’s heart is not at least as light as the Feather, he will be unable to proceed safely to paradise.  In fact, his soul might actually be devoured by one of the strange beasts populating the underworld.  Anxiety about these consequences fueled what we might now think of as a religious-industrial complex, which played a major role in the social structure and economic landscape of ancient Egypt.
This image was painted over layers of cartonnage, a composite of plaster, linen, and papyrus.  You can visit Padimut’s mummy case at the Semitic Museum in our “Egypt: Magic and the Afterlife” exhibit.

semiticmuseum:

This is one of many detailed scenes adorning the mummy case of Padimut, a priest and engraver who lived in ancient Thebes in the 22nd Dynasty (945-712 B.C.E.).  Coffin paintings such as this are often self-referential in nature, describing the ideal journey of the deceased through the underworld, the land of Duat; sometimes they even include instructions, much like the mummy texts

This scene shows Osiris sitting in judgment of Padimut’s heart, which is being weighed against the Feather of Truth.  The assumption is that if Padimut’s heart is not at least as light as the Feather, he will be unable to proceed safely to paradise.  In fact, his soul might actually be devoured by one of the strange beasts populating the underworld.  Anxiety about these consequences fueled what we might now think of as a religious-industrial complex, which played a major role in the social structure and economic landscape of ancient Egypt.

This image was painted over layers of cartonnage, a composite of plaster, linen, and papyrus.  You can visit Padimut’s mummy case at the Semitic Museum in our “Egypt: Magic and the Afterlife” exhibit.

(via missedinhistory)

diasporicroots:

the-nile-river:

African Gods of the Nile from history

Below is a brief overview of ancient gods that existed along the Nile from present day Egypt all the way to Ethiopia

Amesemi
Protective goddess and wife of Apedemak, the lion-god. She was represented with a crown shaped as a falcon, or with a crescent moon on her head on top of which a falcon was standing. 

Apedemak

Apedemak, was a lion-headed warrior god worshiped in Nubia by Meroiticpeoples. A number of Meroitic temples dedicated to Apedemak are known from the Butanaregion: NaqaMeroe, and Musawwarat es-Sufra, which seems to be his chief cult place. In the temple of Naqa built by the rulers of Meroe he was depicted as a three-headed leonine god with four arms, but he is also depicted as a single-headed leonine deity.

Apedemak played little role in Egyptian religion, being a product of the Meroitic culture.

Arensnuphis

Arensnuphis (in Egyptian: Iryhemesnefer, ỉrỉ-ḥms-nfr, “the good companion”) is a deity from the Kingdom of Kush in ancient Nubia, first attested at Musawwarat el-Sufra in the 3rd century BC. His worship spread to the Egyptian-controlled portion of Nubia in the Ptolemaic Period(305–30 BC). His mythological role is unknown; he was depicted as a lion and as a human with a crown of feathers and sometimes a spear.

Arensnuphis was worshipped at Philae, where he was called the “companion” of the Egyptian goddess Isis, and at Dendur. The Egyptians syncretized him with their gods Anhur and Shu.

Dedwen

Dedun (or Dedwen) was a Nubian god worshipped during ancient times in that part of Africa and attested as early as 2400 BC. There is much uncertainty about his original nature, especially since he was depicted as a lion, a role which usually was assigned to the son of another deity. Nothing is known of the earlier Nubian mythology from which this deity arose, however. The earliest known information in Egyptian writings about Dedun indicates that he already had become a god of incense by the time of the writings. Since at this historical point, incense was an extremely expensive luxury commodity and Nubia was the source of much of it, he was quite an important deity. The wealth that the trade in incense delivered to Nubia led to his being identified by them as the god of prosperity, and of wealth in particular.

He is said to have been associated with a fire that threatened to destroy the other deities, however, leading many Nubiologists to speculate that there may have been a great fire at a shared complex of temples to different deities, that started in a temple of Dedun, although there are no candidate events known for this.

Although mentioned in the pyramid texts of Ancient Egypt as being a Nubian deity,[1] there is no evidence that Dedun was worshipped by the Egyptians, nor that he was worshipped in any location north of Swenet (contemporary Aswan), which was considered the most southerly city of Ancient Egypt. Nevertheless, in the Middle Kingdom of Egypt, during the Egyptian rule over Kush, Dedun was said by the Egyptians to be the protector of deceased Nubian rulers and their god of incense, thereby associated with funerary rites.

Mandulis

The Temple of Kalabsha in Nubia was dedicated to Mandulis which was a Nubian form ofHorus. A cult dedicated to Mandulis can also be found in Egypt, at Philae.

Mandulis was often depicted wearing an elaborate headdress of ram’s horns, cobras and plumes surmounted by sun discs. He was sometimes shown in the form of a hawk, but wearing a human head.

Mehit

Lioness-goddess and wife of Onuris; she was in Egyptian myths told to be from Nubia. She appears to have been a vengeful goddess, representing the “Eye of Re.” Another spelling was Mekhit.

Sebiumeker

God of procreation, originating in Meroë region. He was represented in human form. His main cult centres were at Musawwarat al-Sufra, east of the 6th catararct. He was either associated with, or transferred into Atum, through Egyptian influences.

It is important to note that in MOST African spiritual systems the feminine principle of god is generally present.

timelightbox:

As a photographer, I have exquisitely bad timing: In nearly 23 years of marriage, my wife points out, I have only taken about 10 pictures of her with her eyes open. Instagram helps make my images look better, but it can’t fix bad timing.In my job, I get to hang out with some of the best photographers in the world, and over the years, shooters like Yuri Kozyrev and Franco Pagetti have patiently explained to be what makes a good picture — composition, lighting, the whole nine yards. I’ve also looked over the shoulders of TIME’s photo editors, the best in the business, and learned a few things.But photography is a mystical art, and for all my knowledge, I could never take a great picture.Until now.The image you see here, taken in Cairo last week, is the best picture I have taken. It may be the best picture I will ever take. If you will indulge a little arrogance, it is perfectly composed, perfectly lit, and perfectly captures a moment of high drama.It was a fluke.It happened as TIME Managing Editor Rick Stengel, photo editor Patrick Witty, Cairo correspondent Ashraf Khalil and I were making our way to Tahrir Square. We’d heard that the protests against President Mohamed Morsi’s recent emergency decree were growing, and there was a sense of something big about to happen. As we turned into one of the entrances to the square, we stopped to watch a street battle between young men (some mere boys) and the Egyptian riot police. This was taking place some 200 yards from us, so we felt relatively safe. I pulled out my iPhone, and started taking some shots.Suddenly, things changed. The young men turned away from the police and started running up the street, directly toward us. It took me a moment to realize why: the police had started to fire tear-gas canisters into the crowd.  Ashraf and I have been gassed enough times over the years to know what to do next: get the heck out of there. Patrick was a few yards away, out of the firing line.I grabbed Rick and pushed. Out of the corner of my eyes, I saw the smoke trail of a canister coming in our direction. I told Rick to close his eyes, and kept shoving him through a panicking crowd. There was no strategic thinking going on, we just needed to get out.We did, but not before we’d taken a blast of the gas in our faces. All things considered, it wasn’t the most noxious gas I’d encountered: Ashraf agreed it was a mild dose. (The really nasty stuff can burn skin.) By the time we got to the square, the effects of the gas were already clearing.It wasn’t until much later that I looked at the pictures I’d taken, and realized that I had somehow captured the moment the gas canister landed at our feet. I have no recollection of taking that picture, but there it was, perfectly framed and lit. Instagram helped sharpen it up. Rick and Patrick liked it, and the photo editors back in NYC decided to run it in the magazine.So there it is: the best picture I’ve ever taken, published in TIME Magazine, no less. And it’s a total, utter fluke.
— Bobby Ghosh, Editor-at-Large
(Follow Bobby on Instagram @ghoshworld)

timelightbox:

As a photographer, I have exquisitely bad timing: In nearly 23 years of marriage, my wife points out, I have only taken about 10 pictures of her with her eyes open. Instagram helps make my images look better, but it can’t fix bad timing.

In my job, I get to hang out with some of the best photographers in the world, and over the years, shooters like Yuri Kozyrev and Franco Pagetti have patiently explained to be what makes a good picture — composition, lighting, the whole nine yards. I’ve also looked over the shoulders of TIME’s photo editors, the best in the business, and learned a few things.

But photography is a mystical art, and for all my knowledge, I could never take a great picture.

Until now.

The image you see here, taken in Cairo last week, is the best picture I have taken. It may be the best picture I will ever take. If you will indulge a little arrogance, it is perfectly composed, perfectly lit, and perfectly captures a moment of high drama.

It was a fluke.

It happened as TIME Managing Editor Rick Stengel, photo editor Patrick Witty, Cairo correspondent Ashraf Khalil and I were making our way to Tahrir Square. We’d heard that the protests against President Mohamed Morsi’s recent emergency decree were growing, and there was a sense of something big about to happen. As we turned into one of the entrances to the square, we stopped to watch a street battle between young men (some mere boys) and the Egyptian riot police. This was taking place some 200 yards from us, so we felt relatively safe. I pulled out my iPhone, and started taking some shots.

Suddenly, things changed. The young men turned away from the police and started running up the street, directly toward us. It took me a moment to realize why: the police had started to fire tear-gas canisters into the crowd.  Ashraf and I have been gassed enough times over the years to know what to do next: get the heck out of there. Patrick was a few yards away, out of the firing line.

I grabbed Rick and pushed. Out of the corner of my eyes, I saw the smoke trail of a canister coming in our direction. I told Rick to close his eyes, and kept shoving him through a panicking crowd. There was no strategic thinking going on, we just needed to get out.

We did, but not before we’d taken a blast of the gas in our faces. All things considered, it wasn’t the most noxious gas I’d encountered: Ashraf agreed it was a mild dose. (The really nasty stuff can burn skin.) By the time we got to the square, the effects of the gas were already clearing.

It wasn’t until much later that I looked at the pictures I’d taken, and realized that I had somehow captured the moment the gas canister landed at our feet. I have no recollection of taking that picture, but there it was, perfectly framed and lit. Instagram helped sharpen it up. Rick and Patrick liked it, and the photo editors back in NYC decided to run it in the magazine.

So there it is: the best picture I’ve ever taken, published in TIME Magazine, no less. And it’s a total, utter fluke.

Bobby Ghosh, Editor-at-Large

(Follow Bobby on Instagram @ghoshworld)

thedailywhat:

Impending S**tstorm of the Day: Egyptians Protest President Mohamed Morsi’s Power Grab

As many as 200,000 Egyptians assembled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and other major cities across the country to protest against Islamist President Mohamed Morsi’s self-issued edict that grants him sweeping powers, including what his critics say is immunity of his office and his Muslim Brotherhood-controlled assembly from judicial oversight. Since President Morsi’s declaration of the decree last Thursday, a 15-year-old member of the Muslim Brotherhood has been killed, more than 500 people injured and a dozen of his supporters’ offices ransacked or set ablaze.
Photo Credit: Jonathan Rashad via Flickr

thedailywhat:

Impending S**tstorm of the Day: Egyptians Protest President Mohamed Morsi’s Power Grab

As many as 200,000 Egyptians assembled in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and other major cities across the country to protest against Islamist President Mohamed Morsi’s self-issued edict that grants him sweeping powers, including what his critics say is immunity of his office and his Muslim Brotherhood-controlled assembly from judicial oversight. Since President Morsi’s declaration of the decree last Thursday, a 15-year-old member of the Muslim Brotherhood has been killed, more than 500 people injured and a dozen of his supporters’ offices ransacked or set ablaze.


Photo Credit: Jonathan Rashad via Flickr

sciencesoup:

Robot Archaeology

Deep within the Great Pyramid of Giza in Cairo are four narrow shafts, discovered in 1872—the two shafts in the “King’s Chamber” extend to open air, but the two in the “Queen’s Chamber” disappear puzzlingly into the architecture. Academics have long debated their purpose , but because no human could access the narrow spaces, no one could confirm their theories—but now we can send robot explorers instead. In 2011, the University of Leeds designed and built a robot as part of the Djedi Project, specifically for scoping out virtually inaccessible archaeological sites. The robot is well-equipped with a coring drill, a miniature robot that can fit through 19 mm holes, and an ultrasonic device that can determine the thickness of walls. It also has a “micro snake” camera that can see around corners, and on a mission through the shafts into a tiny hidden chamber, the Djedi robot sent back images of 4,500 year old markings. Researchers pieced these images together to reveal hieroglyphs marked in red paint. Red-painted numbers and graffiti are quite common around Giza—they’re often marks from masons or work gangs, depicting numbers, dates and names. These particular markings have not been seen by human eyes for thousands of years, and archaeologists think they might help us understand the purpose of the mysterious shafts.

This week marks the 213th anniversary of one of the most important archaeological finds ever: The Rosetta Stone. How was it discovered? Why is it so important? 
Dig in here…

This week marks the 213th anniversary of one of the most important archaeological finds ever: The Rosetta Stone. How was it discovered? Why is it so important?

Dig in here…