How Did We Start Paying Income Tax?

The U.S. tax system is notoriously complex, but how did it end up this way? And what are the alternative ideas? Learn more about the bizarre evolution of taxes in this episode of BrainStuff.

The Most Horrifying and Scary Easter Bunnies of All Time

Spend some time revisiting why you learned at a young age to be unsettled by people dressed in costumes. Why, why, why were these bunnies allowed near children?! See the rest of the of the nightmare-fuel gallery here.

How Passover Works
Passover (Pesach in Hebrew) is an eight-day festival that begins with the meal called the Passover Seder. The story retold during the Seder is a classic one: slavery and freedom, heroes and villains, unheeded warnings and horrific wrath, and, of course, great rejoicing. 
Read on…

How Passover Works

Passover (Pesach in Hebrew) is an eight-day festival that begins with the meal called the Passover Seder. The story retold during the Seder is a classic one: slavery and freedom, heroes and villains, unheeded warnings and horrific wrath, and, of course, great rejoicing. 

Read on

nprfreshair:

102 years ago tonight the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank less than three hours later. 
Take a look at this photo series from Retronaut highlighting the construction of the ship. 

nprfreshair:

102 years ago tonight the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank less than three hours later. 

Take a look at this photo series from Retronaut highlighting the construction of the ship. 

(via npr)

yahoonewsphotos:

Human body parts grown in a lab

In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in the laboratory in a bold attempt to make body parts using stem cells.

It is among several labs around the world, including in the U.S., that are working on the futuristic idea of growing custom-made organs in the lab.

While only a handful of patients have received the British lab-made organs so far— including tear ducts, blood vessels and windpipes — researchers hope they will soon be able to transplant more types of body parts into patients, including what would be the world’s first nose made partly from stem cells. (AP)

Find more news related pictures in our photo galleries and follow us on Tumblr

(via stufftoblowyourmind)

"Seaweed is a name applied to almost any plantlike marine organism large enough to be seen with the unaided eye. Seaweeds grow in underwater beds, float on the sea surface, attach to rocks and piers, and wash up on shore."

Show another random fact.

mymodernmet:

Lifestyle photographer Grace Chon recently turned the camera on her 10-month-old baby Jasper and their 7-year-old rescue dog Zoey, putting them side-by-side in the some of the most adorable portraits ever.

newyorker:

How did the zebra get its stripes? A new paper suggests one theory to explain this biological mystery: that the stripes repel insects. http://nyr.kr/1ehD1uA

“Discouraging bites from flies is obviously useful, since the insects often carry fatal diseases. Also, while a single bite from blood-eating flies extracts just a tiny droplet of blood, thousands of bites per day can add up to significant blood loss.”

Photograph: Valerie Shaff/Getty

newyorker:

How did the zebra get its stripes? A new paper suggests one theory to explain this biological mystery: that the stripes repel insects. http://nyr.kr/1ehD1uA

“Discouraging bites from flies is obviously useful, since the insects often carry fatal diseases. Also, while a single bite from blood-eating flies extracts just a tiny droplet of blood, thousands of bites per day can add up to significant blood loss.”

Photograph: Valerie Shaff/Getty

(Source: newyorker.com)

mymodernmet:

24-year-old photographer Asher Svidensky recently traveled to west Mongolia with the intention of documenting the lives of traditional Kazakh eagle hunters, people who tame eagles for the purpose of hunting smaller animals.

With the traditions typically laying in the hands of the boys and the men, the biggest surprise throughout the journey was Svidensky’s discovery of a young eagle huntress, 13-year-old Ashol Pan, the daughter of an experienced eagle hunter. These stunning photographs symbolize the potential future of the eagle hunting tradition as it expands beyond a male-only practice.

strugglingtobeheard:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

her name is Katherine G. Johnson

strugglingtobeheard:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

her name is Katherine G. Johnson

(via scinerds)

sci-universe:

53 years ago today (April 12), Yuri Gagarin, a Soviet pilot and cosmonaut, became the first human to travel into space and change history, when his Vostok spacecraft completed an orbit of the Earth.

So on April 12, Gagarin, who turned into an international celebrity and hero, is being commemorated for paving the way for future space exploration by the International Day of Human Space Flight (Cosmonautics Day).

I really recommend looking him up. There’s so much to know about him and the history-making flight.

My favourite thing is probably the landing to an unplanned site: A farmer and her daughter observed the strange scene of a figure in a bright orange suit with a large white helmet landing near them by parachute. Gagarin later recalled, “When they saw me in my space suit and the parachute dragging alongside as I walked, they started to back away in fear. I told them, don’t be afraid, I am a Soviet citizen like you, who has descended from space and I must find a telephone to call Moscow!”

Happy International Day of Human Space Flight!

thats-the-way-it-was:

April 12, 1961: The first man in space.
Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin becomes the first human being to travel into space aboard the spacecraft Vostok 1.  The 27-year-old test pilot also became the first human to orbit the planet. Guided by an automatic control system, Vostok 1 orbited Earth in 89 minutes at a maximum speed of 187 miles an hour. 
Gagarin became a worldwide celebrity and was awarded the Order of Lenin and given the title of Hero of the Soviet Union. Streets were named and monuments created in his honor.
Gagarin died died seven years later in a routine jet test flight. His ashes are buried inside the Kremlin walls.
Photo:  Rolls Press/Heritage Images/Getty Images

thats-the-way-it-was:

April 12, 1961: The first man in space.

Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin becomes the first human being to travel into space aboard the spacecraft Vostok 1.  The 27-year-old test pilot also became the first human to orbit the planet. Guided by an automatic control system, Vostok 1 orbited Earth in 89 minutes at a maximum speed of 187 miles an hour. 

Gagarin became a worldwide celebrity and was awarded the Order of Lenin and given the title of Hero of the Soviet Union. Streets were named and monuments created in his honor.

Gagarin died died seven years later in a routine jet test flight. His ashes are buried inside the Kremlin walls.

Photo:  Rolls Press/Heritage Images/Getty Images