HowStuffWorks

Oct 21

How can someone die from drinking too much water?
In January 2007, hours after competing in a radio station contest to win a Nintendo Wii, 28-year-old Jennifer Strange was found dead in her California home. The station’s “Hold Your Wee for a Wii” challenge awarded the game system to the contestant who could drink the most water without having to take a trip to the bathroom. According to preliminary autopsy reports, Ms. Strange apparently died from drinking too much water too quickly, resulting in a condition called water intoxication.
Read more… 

How can someone die from drinking too much water?

In January 2007, hours after competing in a radio station contest to win a Nintendo Wii, 28-year-old Jennifer Strange was found dead in her California home. The station’s “Hold Your Wee for a Wii” challenge awarded the game system to the contestant who could drink the most water without having to take a trip to the bathroom. According to preliminary autopsy reports, Ms. Strange apparently died from drinking too much water too quickly, resulting in a condition called water intoxication.

Read more… 

pbstv:

Would you wear these?!
Learn about the history of glass and the connections between the development of mirrors, reading, talking on the phone, and more in this week’s episode of HOW WE GOT TO NOW with Steven Johnson, airing Wednesday (10/22) at 10/9c.
And join us on Tumblr during the broadcast while we LIVE-GIF the episode!

pbstv:

Would you wear these?!

Learn about the history of glass and the connections between the development of mirrors, reading, talking on the phone, and more in this week’s episode of HOW WE GOT TO NOW with Steven Johnson, airing Wednesday (10/22) at 10/9c.

And join us on Tumblr during the broadcast while we LIVE-GIF the episode!

unconsumption:


The energy embodied in the stuff of our lives represents a major—maybe the major—way that we contribute to environmental problems.
And that’s why we created this special report, The New Energy Cycle. The way that things—food, phones, cars, houses—get made and then disposed of doesn’t get enough attention.

A new series at The Atlantic’s website: The Energy in Things
Sounds promising!

unconsumption:

The energy embodied in the stuff of our lives represents a major—maybe the major—way that we contribute to environmental problems.

And that’s why we created this special report, The New Energy Cycle. The way that things—food, phones, cars, houses—get made and then disposed of doesn’t get enough attention.

A new series at The Atlantic’s website: The Energy in Things

Sounds promising!

Oct 20

[video]

Oct 19

[video]

Oct 17

stufftoblowyourmind:

10 Human Rituals of Pain
n our podcast episode ‘The Zen of Pain,’ we discuss religious and secular rituals of voluntary and self-inflicted suffering. How does this desire for pain factor into our evolutionary ascent? Can we really find liberation by the lash and transcendence on the rack? Even your morning workout may serve as a kind of ritualized self-punishment.
*** WARNING: THIS GALLERY CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES ***

stufftoblowyourmind:

10 Human Rituals of Pain

n our podcast episode ‘The Zen of Pain,’ we discuss religious and secular rituals of voluntary and self-inflicted suffering. How does this desire for pain factor into our evolutionary ascent? Can we really find liberation by the lash and transcendence on the rack? Even your morning workout may serve as a kind of ritualized self-punishment.

*** WARNING: THIS GALLERY CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES ***

himikai:

ultrafacts:

Ultrafacts Source

My mom used to think I was crazy when I snatch the remote and turn it down from 26 to 25.

himikai:

ultrafacts:

Ultrafacts Source

My mom used to think I was crazy when I snatch the remote and turn it down from 26 to 25.

(Source: ultrafacts, via ultrafacts)

[video]

10 Incredible Holes
Millions of years of tectonic upheaval and erosion, as well as thousands of years of human modification, have created a surface broken by rugged mountain ranges, deep gorges and other fantastic features. Prominent among these formations are holes — some natural, like ocean trenches, craters, sinkholes and canyons, and some man-made, like mines and boreholes.
Read more…

10 Incredible Holes

Millions of years of tectonic upheaval and erosion, as well as thousands of years of human modification, have created a surface broken by rugged mountain ranges, deep gorges and other fantastic features. Prominent among these formations are holes — some natural, like ocean trenches, craters, sinkholes and canyons, and some man-made, like mines and boreholes.

Read more…

10 Things That Went Missing Without a Trace
Here’s a look at 10 of the most puzzling disappearances ever!
Read more…

10 Things That Went Missing Without a Trace

Here’s a look at 10 of the most puzzling disappearances ever!

Read more…

“For the first time, and to the astonishment of many of their colleagues, researchers created what they call Alzheimer’s in a Dish — a petri dish with human brain cells that develop the telltale structures of Alzheimer’s disease. In doing so, they resolved a longstanding problem of how to study Alzheimer’s and search for drugs to treat it; the best they had until now were mice that developed an imperfect form of the disease.” — Breakthrough Replicates Human Brain Cells for Use in Alzheimer’s Research - NYTimes.com (via neuromorphogenesis)

(via neuromorphogenesis)

Oct 16

[video]